Sophie turns out to be no pushover

Rate This To continue then, with Sophie; I always see her as being, like Lucie Manette in ‘A Tale of Two Cities’ the embodiment of loving kindness. Unlike Lucie Manette, though, she is a female character whom the author wanted to show developing in independence as the story goes on. She starts off submissive (as … Continue reading Sophie turns out to be no pushover

Plasticity and Evolving Characters

A year or so ago I took some time off from reading a selection of the classic robber novels -ie ‘Rinaldo Rinaldini’ and ‘Rob Roy’ - for a change of genre with Elizabeth Gaskell’s ‘North and South’. What interested me particularly about this book – though it’s a good read anyway, all about the terrible … Continue reading Plasticity and Evolving Characters

It Would be Writing a Spoiler to Say How Sophie comes to be in Revolutionary Paris…

It would be a spoiler to say how Sophie comes to turn up in Revolutionary Paris in May 1794 (when by all accounts she should be in her older brother John's house in Chester, before being despatched to Plas Uchaf, North Wales) , but anyway, Emile as Monsieur Gilles  meets her and is touched. Very … Continue reading It Would be Writing a Spoiler to Say How Sophie comes to be in Revolutionary Paris…

Sophie’s options are rather different than Emile’s…

Emile, the eponymous scoundrel of the title and the nephew of the Dowager Countess for whom Sophie de Courcy is companion, would normally have an enormous number of options compared to Sophie herself about his 'life choices'; as a eighteenth century aristocrat, he might have to marry for position, but that would not exactly fetter … Continue reading Sophie’s options are rather different than Emile’s…