The Delights of Good Bad Writing

  I am run off my feet at the moment in real life with family responsibilities – as always happens during July and August – so I haven’t been able to keep up with writing at all these past few weeks. That’s a good thing in a way; real life events should always take precedence … Continue reading The Delights of Good Bad Writing

Writing, Real Life Events, and the Works of Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Georgette Heyer and Louisa M Alcott

Writers, of course, would not be human if many of the circumstances of their lives did not affect their fiction. Even writers of the fantastic must combine these impressions with the imaginative creations in their books. The authors world of fantasy is to some extent part of his or her particular ‘take’ on reality, his … Continue reading Writing, Real Life Events, and the Works of Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, Georgette Heyer and Louisa M Alcott

Elizabeth Gaskell’s ‘Sylvia’s Lovers’ Protagonists and Antagonists and More Farce

Lucinda Elliot, ascending platform: OK, so I am back again after escaping the clutches of that press gang in that time warp occasioned by my last post; here I am, restored to being a blogger sitting at my pc and typing up a geeky post and planning on making a cup of tea… On protagonists … Continue reading Elizabeth Gaskell’s ‘Sylvia’s Lovers’ Protagonists and Antagonists and More Farce

A Successful Cross-Genre Novel Without a Clear Protagonist; Georgette Heyer’s ‘The Talisman Ring’

OIn the last post I was waffling on about protagonists and main characters. I gather that according to some writing advice, it’s meant to be fatal not to have a clear protagonist. What a tiresome man I know calls an ‘Absolute No-No.’ I rambled on to points of view, remarking that  some writing advice insists … Continue reading A Successful Cross-Genre Novel Without a Clear Protagonist; Georgette Heyer’s ‘The Talisman Ring’

A writer who wrote what she didn’t believe in- and created a genre

All 'How To' books on writing always say that you must write ‘What you believe in’ on the grounds that if you don’t believe in the worth of your writing, who will? This seems to make sense; I need only think of the contrast between the early works by the (now obscure, but once famous) … Continue reading A writer who wrote what she didn’t believe in- and created a genre

Charles Garvice as an Influence on the Modern Romantic Novel – and Caught out by Garvice’s Devices

In my last post, I admitted to a terrible thing – I have actually been able to read four more of the novels of Charles Garvice after re-discovering that one I snorted through at fourteen – ‘The Outcast of the Family Or a Battle Between Love and Pride’. Since then I’’ve read ‘His Guardian Angel … Continue reading Charles Garvice as an Influence on the Modern Romantic Novel – and Caught out by Garvice’s Devices

Flat and Rounded Characters in Fiction: Part One

I believe EM Forster in an article somewhere wrote of ‘flat’ and ‘round’ characters, which is an intriguing definition. I must seek it out (after finishing ‘Clarissa’ and re-reading ‘The Taming of the Shrew’ for the Goodreads discussion and reading  Francis Franklin's ‘Suzi and the Monsters’ and reading up on a bit of literary criticism … Continue reading Flat and Rounded Characters in Fiction: Part One