‘Umbra Magic’ by Christina Herlyn : Review: Four and a Half Stars for an Excellent Dystopian Story Enlivened by Humour

  Four and a half stars for an excellent read - with a hero I really like (despite my last few posts, this can happen now and then with me). Andromeda Bochs, the original ‘kick arse’ heroine - that’s my British spelling coming out – who refuses to be known as anything but Andee– is … Continue reading ‘Umbra Magic’ by Christina Herlyn : Review: Four and a Half Stars for an Excellent Dystopian Story Enlivened by Humour

An Acronym for Remembering the Essential Points for Writing a Page Turner

< I made up an acronym while writing, to remind me of some essential points to remember when trying to write a page turner. FLASH. No; not as in a flasher. Actually, I suppose conjuring up an a mental image of one of those old school perverts would be as good a way to entertain … Continue reading An Acronym for Remembering the Essential Points for Writing a Page Turner

Review of ‘Evolutionary Magic’ by Christina Herlyn

https://www.amazon.com/Evolutionary-Magic-Andromeda-Christina-Herlyn/dp/B08LJPKD1L On Smashwords Here I was immediately drawn into this story of Andee’s struggle against the merciless Corporation which controls this futuristic, monster ridden dystopia. The vivid word pictures brought this horrific society, with its hideous combination of centralised power, environmental disaster and monster ridden industrial decay, vividly to life. I could see it as … Continue reading Review of ‘Evolutionary Magic’ by Christina Herlyn

What Makes a Reader Empathise with a Lead Character is Often an Indefinable Combination of Things

Re-reading my favourite novel by Margaret Atwood, ‘Bodily Harm’, made me wonder, as I have done before, whether or not you have to identify strongly with the lead character to be really drawn in by a novel.I like the main character, Renny Wilford, well enough – I like her courage, and her detached, cool humour. … Continue reading What Makes a Reader Empathise with a Lead Character is Often an Indefinable Combination of Things

Those Necessary Sympathetic, Rounded Characters: A Classic Novel Without Them

'Sylvia's Lovers' by Elizabeth Gaskell in one sentence: 'Philip Hepburn worships Sylvia Robson, and finds dishonour; Sylvia Robson worships Charley Kinraid, and finds disillusionment; Charley Kinraid worships himself, and finds a wife who agrees with him and a career in the Royal Navy.’

‘The Tenant of Wildfell Hall’ by Anne Bronte; Structure and the Role of the Antagonist

When re-reading ‘The Tenant of Wildfell Hall’ I was struck by many things. I hope I don’t annoy the spirit of Anne Bronte by making a comparison with the structure of ‘Wuthering Heights’ as a beginning, though this is not the invidious comparison of the sort that were until recently usually made between her work … Continue reading ‘The Tenant of Wildfell Hall’ by Anne Bronte; Structure and the Role of the Antagonist

Complex Villains and Samuel Richardson’s Robert Lovelace from ‘Clarrissa’

Complicated characters , whether heroes or villains (I’m applying the terms to both sexes) or a bit of both, are always fascinating. As I see it, there’s only two problems with complex characters , good and bad: one is that they take so much work to envisage and the other is that, portaying them adequately … Continue reading Complex Villains and Samuel Richardson’s Robert Lovelace from ‘Clarrissa’

Characters in John Galsworthy’s ‘The Forstye Saga’ and Simone de Beauvoir;s ‘The Blood of Others’.

Mari Biella in a fascinating post on her blog comments on the many variables that can lead to a novel’s finding lasting fame or joining ‘The Great Slush Pile of History? http://maribiella.wordpress.com/2014/11/07/the-great-slush-pile-of-history I commented on this post (with dreadful typing; new keyboard, sorry) on how uninspiring I found John Galsworthy’s ‘The Forsyte Saga’. This series … Continue reading Characters in John Galsworthy’s ‘The Forstye Saga’ and Simone de Beauvoir;s ‘The Blood of Others’.