Re-Reading ‘Edith’s Diary’ by Patricia Highsmith: A Fascinating Psychological Thriller

I read a few of Patricia Highsmith’s novels and some of her short stories when I was in my late teens and early twenties. I remember her as an astute writer, with a sense of grim comedy, an extraordinary sense of the complexities of the darker sides of the human psyche, and the ability to … Continue reading Re-Reading ‘Edith’s Diary’ by Patricia Highsmith: A Fascinating Psychological Thriller

The Brilliant ‘Bodily Harm’ by Margaret Atwood Revisited

Recently, I broke off from my ongoing good old independent research into women's escapism  (and if anyone reading this has read anything recent  and not partisian on the topic of women’s escapism and reading romances, do let me know). Finding Margaret Atwood’s Bodily Harm on the shelves of someone I was visiting, I pounced on … Continue reading The Brilliant ‘Bodily Harm’ by Margaret Atwood Revisited

Patrick Hamilton’s Dark Humour: ‘The Slaves of Solitude’.

I was delighted to discover recently that the works of Patrick Hamilton, one of my long favourite writers, have come back into fashion.  In fact, my favourite work by him 'The Slaves of Solitude' - generally regarded as one of his masterpieces - is currently ranking at 70,000 in the Kindle store. How far this … Continue reading Patrick Hamilton’s Dark Humour: ‘The Slaves of Solitude’.

Johnson’s Criticism of Shakespeare’s ‘Cymbeline’ and the Problematic Nature of Dark Comedy

‘ 'To remark on the folly of the fiction, the absurdity of the conduct, the confusion of the names, and manners of different times, and the impossibility of events in any system of life, were to waste criticism upon unresisting imbicility...’ That is not an attack of a piece of work by some hack writer … Continue reading Johnson’s Criticism of Shakespeare’s ‘Cymbeline’ and the Problematic Nature of Dark Comedy

Wilbur Smith’s ‘Shout at the Devil’: A Book Where Comedy Turns to Tragedy

I have been getting cold feet (very appropriate given the recent icy weather) about my short novel based round the 1819 Peterloo Massacre .  Of course, mine will be only one obscure publication out  of many books, articles, plays or whatever that will surely be released to mark the bicentenary  – I know there’s a … Continue reading Wilbur Smith’s ‘Shout at the Devil’: A Book Where Comedy Turns to Tragedy

That Scoundrel Émile Dubois’ is a Winner of the B.R.A.G Medallion for Outstanding Fiction

'That Scoundrel Émile Dubois’ is a Winner of the B.R.A.G Medallion for Outstanding Fiction. Winning this award really made my day. I had entered my first book, the paranormal –historical- romance satire of Gothic, ‘That Scoundrel Émile Dubois’ just hoping that I might be one of those whose books are considered to be of a … Continue reading That Scoundrel Émile Dubois’ is a Winner of the B.R.A.G Medallion for Outstanding Fiction

Review of ‘Birdwoman; The Memoirs of A Lovesick Siren’ by Anne Carlisle

This is an outstandingly original story, which draws the reader in at once into the fascinating world of the siren. It’s exciting, well paced, funny, sad, outrageous and startlingly believable all at once. The writing is vivid, evocative, bawdy, witty and sometimes poetic. I took at once to the heroine, Destiny, who is born, along … Continue reading Review of ‘Birdwoman; The Memoirs of A Lovesick Siren’ by Anne Carlisle

Laughing Out Loud With Jane Austen; ‘Sense and Sensibility’ as Tragi-Comedy…

Recently, I re-read ‘Sense and Sensibility’. That is my favourite Jane Austen novel. The humour is brilliant; it made me laugh out loud a few times, and I can be hard to please. ‘Pride and Prejudice’ is equally funny, of course, and much lighter in overall tone; there is also the happy ending to the … Continue reading Laughing Out Loud With Jane Austen; ‘Sense and Sensibility’ as Tragi-Comedy…

The Brilliant ‘Bodily Harm’ by Margaret Atwood Revisited

Recently, I broke off from my ongoing good old independent research into women's escapism  (and if anyone reading this has read anything recent  and not partisian on the topic of women’s escapism and reading romances, do let me know). Finding Margaret Atwood’s Bodily Harm on the shelves of someone I was visiting, I pounced on … Continue reading The Brilliant ‘Bodily Harm’ by Margaret Atwood Revisited