Review of ‘My Lady Ludlow’ by Elizabeth Gaskell.

‘My Lady Ludlow’ could be classed among Elizabeth Gaskell’s novels, being over 60,000 words long. Still, it's a good deal shorter than the three volumes that were considered a respectable length for a novel by Victorians, and is included among her shorter and more minor works. Besides, the structure is frankly faulty; or anyway, the … Continue reading Review of ‘My Lady Ludlow’ by Elizabeth Gaskell.

Review of ‘Comin’ Thro’ the Rye’ by Helen Mathers (1875): Victorian Melodrama with an Horrific Victorian Patriarch

I can't find the edition I read, which is certainly at least 120... I’ve written before about how my parents renovated rambling country houses, and the problem of those many empty bookshelves my mother filled up with bargain job lots from auctions, which often consisted of late Victorian and early Edwardian popular fiction. That was … Continue reading Review of ‘Comin’ Thro’ the Rye’ by Helen Mathers (1875): Victorian Melodrama with an Horrific Victorian Patriarch

Review of ‘Swimming in the Rainbow’ by Rebecca Lochlann

I thought that the fireworks and thunderclaps of the climatic end to the former theme of this series would make it a hard act to follow. I was happy to find myself proved wrong. The reader doesn’t need to worry. Though the action in this concluding instalment starts on a minor key, the dramatic tension … Continue reading Review of ‘Swimming in the Rainbow’ by Rebecca Lochlann

Review of ‘Conflicted Magic’ by Christina Herlyn: A Tantalising Taster for a Gripping Series

In the dystopian world which develops on the coming of the asteroid Atlas, there are certain grades of people. There are the Normals, who must be protected from the dreadful monsters who emerged from the volcanoes that erupted on the arrival of Atlas. There are also the Evolutionaries, born with a mutated gene – and … Continue reading Review of ‘Conflicted Magic’ by Christina Herlyn: A Tantalising Taster for a Gripping Series

Review of ‘When the Moon Whispers’ by Rebecca Lochlann: Brilliant and Dramatic

I was immediately drawn into this epic series, by the first book, which takes place in Bronze Age Greece. I was entranced by the unusual combination of outstanding historical research, excellent writing style, intriguing characters and exciting theme. Since then, and I have been eagerly following the progress of this saga of a battle between … Continue reading Review of ‘When the Moon Whispers’ by Rebecca Lochlann: Brilliant and Dramatic

Re-reading Mario Puzo’s 1969 ‘The Godfather’

I first read this at seventeen, longer ago than I care to admit. I thought the writing style was poor in places even then. I re-read it because Albert Zukerman recommends studying the techniques the author uses as a writer of popular fiction. He is all admiration of Puzo's ability to create a larger than … Continue reading Re-reading Mario Puzo’s 1969 ‘The Godfather’

‘Lady Audley’s Secret’: Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s Mid Victorian Sensationalist Novel

How embarrasing: I typed and published a whole post - a review of this notorious Victorian novel - and only the image came out! I blame the new editing system on WordPress....Well, that and my own muddle headedness... Lady Audley’s Secret’ , the 1862  best selling Victorian sensationalist novel by Mary Elizabeth Braddon, is based … Continue reading ‘Lady Audley’s Secret’: Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s Mid Victorian Sensationalist Novel

Review of Balazac’s ‘Cousin Bette’.

I enjoyed Balzac’s ‘Pére Goriot’ overall, despite – maybe because of – the melodramatic scenes. I particularly enjoyed the chapters which dealt with the villain Vautrin, and the sordid lodging Parisian house where he is in hiding. I expected to enjoy ‘Cousin Bette’, too, especially as it is considered to be one of Balzac’s masterpieces.Sadly, … Continue reading Review of Balazac’s ‘Cousin Bette’.

Jane Austen’s Unfinished Work ‘The Watsons’

To my shame, I never had got round to reading Jane Austen’s unfinished work, ‘The Watsons’ until now. Well, that’s not quite true. I began to read it in my early twenties, and got distracted by something else and never got back to it. In a way, it’s a comfort remembering that, because since then … Continue reading Jane Austen’s Unfinished Work ‘The Watsons’

‘Umbra Magic’ by Christina Herlyn : Review: Four and a Half Stars for an Excellent Dystopian Story Enlivened by Humour

  Four and a half stars for an excellent read - with a hero I really like (despite my last few posts, this can happen now and then with me). Andromeda Bochs, the original ‘kick arse’ heroine - that’s my British spelling coming out – who refuses to be known as anything but Andee– is … Continue reading ‘Umbra Magic’ by Christina Herlyn : Review: Four and a Half Stars for an Excellent Dystopian Story Enlivened by Humour