Review of ‘Evolutionary Magic’ by Christina Herlyn

https://www.amazon.com/Evolutionary-Magic-Andromeda-Christina-Herlyn/dp/B08LJPKD1L On Smashwords Here I was immediately drawn into this story of Andee’s struggle against the merciless Corporation which controls this futuristic, monster ridden dystopia. The vivid word pictures brought this horrific society, with its hideous combination of centralised power, environmental disaster and monster ridden industrial decay, vividly to life. I could see it as … Continue reading Review of ‘Evolutionary Magic’ by Christina Herlyn

Re-Reading ‘The Go Between’ by LP Hartley

I have just started re-reading ‘The Go Between’ by L P Hartley. I last read it longer ago than I care to admit – in my early twenties. It made a big impression on me then. I was struck by the vivid writing, brilliant use of a string of connected images and the striking ability … Continue reading Re-Reading ‘The Go Between’ by LP Hartley

The Brilliant ‘Bodily Harm’ by Margaret Atwood Revisited

Recently, I broke off from my ongoing good old independent research into women's escapism  (and if anyone reading this has read anything recent  and not partisian on the topic of women’s escapism and reading romances, do let me know). Finding Margaret Atwood’s Bodily Harm on the shelves of someone I was visiting, I pounced on … Continue reading The Brilliant ‘Bodily Harm’ by Margaret Atwood Revisited

Elizabeth Taylor’s ‘Mrs Palfrey at the Clairmont’: Darkest Humour

I suppose there are books which have a more darkly comic theme than 'Mrs Palrey at the Claremont' - Martin Amis' 'LondonFields', for instance, and a few others, including a book I really enjoyed when I was twenty, 'Safe Behind Bars' by Andrew Hall; generally, though, I would calll it humour of the darkest type.Oddly … Continue reading Elizabeth Taylor’s ‘Mrs Palfrey at the Clairmont’: Darkest Humour

Anne Brontë’s ‘Agnes Grey’: A Melancholy Story with a Happy Ending

I first read Anne Brontë’s ‘Agnes Grey’ a long time ago – in my early twenties – about the time that I first read ‘The Tenant of Wildfell Hall’. I believe a fair number of people consider it her masterpiece in its brevity and tight plotting. I can see it has those features, but I … Continue reading Anne Brontë’s ‘Agnes Grey’: A Melancholy Story with a Happy Ending

‘A Court of Thorns and Roses’ by Sarah J Maas: Certainly a Page Turner

I read ‘Court of Thorns and Roses’ by Sarah J Maas because I was intrigued by the praise given to it in the excellent book of writing advice ‘How to Write a Page Turner’ by Jordan Rosenfeld. The author was evidently drawn in by the series of which this is the first, and a great … Continue reading ‘A Court of Thorns and Roses’ by Sarah J Maas: Certainly a Page Turner

Purple Prose and a Rapist ‘Hero’: The Original Bodice Ripper: Review of ‘The Flame and the Flower’ by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss

Marty-Stu rapes Mary-Sue and then they find a love so true… I am so glad that I have finished this (by the way, I read it for research: honestly!). I detested reading it; and it was epic length. The only reason I am not giving it one star is because an online friend of mine … Continue reading Purple Prose and a Rapist ‘Hero’: The Original Bodice Ripper: Review of ‘The Flame and the Flower’ by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss

US English and its Continued Use of Forms from Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century UK English

It is an interesting fact that US English retains some of the words and expressions of seventeenth and eighteenth century English, which are wrongly thought of as ‘American English’. For instance, there is use of the word that is commonly now spelt as ‘aint’, but can be found as ‘in’t’ and ‘an’t’.  That was once … Continue reading US English and its Continued Use of Forms from Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century UK English

Review of Jordan Rosenfeld’s ‘How to Write a Page Turner’

I have just finished reading Jordan Rosenfeld’s ‘How to Write a Page Turner’. I thought the advice in it was invaluable. Not only that, but it is detailed; too many ‘how to’ books for writers are not sufficiently specific. You might be told to ‘infuse the pages with tension’ and to ‘keep raising the conflict’ … Continue reading Review of Jordan Rosenfeld’s ‘How to Write a Page Turner’

Shelf Life: The Book of Better Endings by Rob Gregson: An Original and Very Funny Fantasy Novel

One of the favourite pieces of advice to writers about creating tension is : - ‘Torment your protagonist’. And, of course, the said writers often don’t stop there. Sometimes, they kill them off. This is to say nothing of the minor characters. How many of those get bumped off in the average writer’s career? Rob … Continue reading Shelf Life: The Book of Better Endings by Rob Gregson: An Original and Very Funny Fantasy Novel