Post Two on Albert Zuckerman’s quote: ‘What counts in judging a character for the reader is what we actually see the character do, as opposed to what is said about him.”

In my previous post, I was writing about Albert Zuckerman's quote and its applicability to questionable anti-heroes, or heroes who convert from anti-heroes into actual heroes in stories. I mentioned how often readers in general are happy to discount these characters' former shabby or downright hateful deeds, as long as they are not described graphically … Continue reading Post Two on Albert Zuckerman’s quote: ‘What counts in judging a character for the reader is what we actually see the character do, as opposed to what is said about him.”

Review of Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier: Vivid Atmoshere: A Shame About the Male Lead…

The atmosphere and the descriptions of the scenery were really good. The idea was original. It was well plotted overall. Generally, the characterisation is cleverly done. I also liked the heroine, who shows herself as generally brave and having integrity. I also liked the fact that the story was about ordinary people - well, they're … Continue reading Review of Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier: Vivid Atmoshere: A Shame About the Male Lead…

Servant Heroes in Historical Romance: A Rarity Compared to Servant Heroines

It is interesting that one of the unwritten rules of historical romance is that the hero must never be a working class man, let alone a manservant. This is the more intriguing, because a fair amount of heroines are maidservants. Of course, in that, they follow the steps of the heroine of one of the … Continue reading Servant Heroes in Historical Romance: A Rarity Compared to Servant Heroines