Heathcliff – No Romantic Hero: Vengeance and Forgiveness in ‘Wuthering Heights’.

I have recently been reading Marianne Thormählen’s fascinating book ‘The Brontës and Religion’ (Cambridge University Press 1999). I shouldn’t be. Really, I should be doing more research,  but I couldn’t resist it. I came across it through its mention in the notes of the 1994 Wordsworth Classic Edition of ‘The Tenant of Wildfell Hall’ as … Continue reading Heathcliff – No Romantic Hero: Vengeance and Forgiveness in ‘Wuthering Heights’.

Albert Zuckerman: ‘What counts in judging a character for the reader is limited to what we actually see the character do, as opposed to what is said about him.’

The quote is, of course, from Zuckerman's book 'Writing the Block Buster Novel'. It is made with reference to a certain Don Corleone. Zuckerman is showing how Puzo makes him sympathetic. That general advice is very good, but I was particularly fascinated by this quote in particular, as it is so astute, and explains an … Continue reading Albert Zuckerman: ‘What counts in judging a character for the reader is limited to what we actually see the character do, as opposed to what is said about him.’

Re-reading Mario Puzo’s 1969 ‘The Godfather’

I first read this at seventeen, longer ago than I care to admit. I thought the writing style was poor in places even then. I re-read it because Albert Zukerman recommends studying the techniques the author uses as a writer of popular fiction. He is all admiration of Puzo's ability to create a larger than … Continue reading Re-reading Mario Puzo’s 1969 ‘The Godfather’

Characters in Classic Novels with Personality Disorders: Part II: Samuel Richardson’s Lovelace, Mr B and Pamela

I ended my former post of lay psychologising about the high prevalence of characters who seem to have personality disorders in famous books, by mentioning Robert Lovelace, the rapist anti-hero of Clarissa. I have written about this fellow elsewhere as a fascinating example of a character personifying the dark side of an author’s psyche – … Continue reading Characters in Classic Novels with Personality Disorders: Part II: Samuel Richardson’s Lovelace, Mr B and Pamela

Characters in Classic Novels with Personality Disorders

Laughs are at a premium these days, what with the pandemic still going on as a second Christmas approaches.That being so, I thought I’d use my recent renewed interest in personality disorders by subjecting some classic characters in fiction to a bit of the dreaded lay analysis.If this post gives a few readers a laugh, … Continue reading Characters in Classic Novels with Personality Disorders

The Antagonist in Various Forms

  I read somewhere the phrase, ‘Inside every antagonist, there’s a protagonist waiting to come out’ ( obviously a variant of the saying ‘inside every fat person, there’s a slim person trying to come out’). The antagonist, of course, makes the story nearly as much as the protagonist. If you have a weak or insufficiently … Continue reading The Antagonist in Various Forms

Review of Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier: Vivid Atmoshere: A Shame About the Male Lead…

The atmosphere and the descriptions of the scenery were really good. The idea was original. It was well plotted overall. Generally, the characterisation is cleverly done. I also liked the heroine, who shows herself as generally brave and having integrity. I also liked the fact that the story was about ordinary people - well, they're … Continue reading Review of Jamaica Inn by Daphne du Maurier: Vivid Atmoshere: A Shame About the Male Lead…

Escapism for Troubled Times: Bargain ebooks ‘That Scoundrel Émile Dubois’ on sale for 0.99 on Amazon from 7 November 2020

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00AOA4FN4 My novel, ‘That Scoundrel Émile Dubois’ , is on sale for 0.99 on Amazon here. From Kobo From here From Nookbooks From here You can get it with Reader sets price from Smashwords From here When writing this, I thought: 'Why ever not have a vampire love story full of humour, and why not … Continue reading Escapism for Troubled Times: Bargain ebooks ‘That Scoundrel Émile Dubois’ on sale for 0.99 on Amazon from 7 November 2020

Interview of Emile Dubois (The Eponymous ‘That Scoundrel Emile Dubois’) By Laura Lee

  Here's an interview with one Émile Dubios... Laura Lee: Come in. Sit down. Would you like something to drink? Émile Dubois: Thank you, Madame. The red wine for a certainty. Georges – my right hand man, you know, though some might spread the rumour that he was my companion in crime – organized this … Continue reading Interview of Emile Dubois (The Eponymous ‘That Scoundrel Emile Dubois’) By Laura Lee

More on ‘Wuthering Heights’ : The Notorious Absence of a Wholly Sympathetic Character and a Moral Compass.

I am still reading  that fascinating book by Marianne Thormëhelen, ‘The Brontës and Religion’, and it raises a point that had vaguely occurred to me, but which the author brings into sharp focus. There is no character in ‘Wuthering Heights’ with whom the reader is meant to identify, who is depicted as generally sympathetic – … Continue reading More on ‘Wuthering Heights’ : The Notorious Absence of a Wholly Sympathetic Character and a Moral Compass.